Aquaculture

We also offer local activities on shellfish. Learn more in Ocean Learning.

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Bivalves for Clean Water

Teri King, Marine Water Quality Specialist

The Bivalves for Clean Water program educates marine shoreline owners and recreational shellfish harvesters about coastal pollution, ecosystem health, water quality and resource management issues challenging Puget Sound and Hood Canal. This multifaceted approach lets participants choose activities that fit their individual learning styles and interests.

Activities offered include workshops, field trips, shellfish-enhancement activities, citizen monitoring, beach walks and assessments, site visits, publications and one-on-one technical assistance.

WSG recruits and trains volunteers to identify and eliminate pollution sources in their watersheds, enhance recreational shellfish populations and conduct safe recreational harvest trips. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer or receiving additional information, please contact Teri King at guatemal@uw.edu. You can also keep up with program activities on Facebook.


Shellfish Conferences

Teri King, Marine Water Quality Specialist

Each year, WSG participates in and organizes conferences and training workshops on aquaculture and related issues and shares research findings with decision makers, producers and resource managers.

WSG contributes to the Washington State Shellfish Initiative, the annual Shellfish Growers Conference, the Pacific Rim Shellfish Sanitation Conference, and one-time events such as symposia on aquaculture and the environment.

The 24th Shellfish Growers Conference will be held February 27–28, 2017, in Union WA. Registration is now open: 24th-shellfish-growers-conference-registration. For more information regarding the conference, contact Teri King, wsgcanal@uw.edu

A 2017 conference draft agenda is available (PDF).


State of the Oyster Study: Testing Shellfish for Health and Safety

Teri King, Marine Water Quality Specialist

Shellfish need clean water to thrive. Pollutants can destroy their beds, and bacteria taken up by shellfish can sicken people who eat them. WSG’s State of the Oyster Study is a citizen science monitoring program that trains waterfront property owners to test the safety of their shellfish before consumption. Four times a year, residents gather clams and oysters at low tide and bring them to WSG to be tested for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and bacterial indicators of fecal contamination.

WSG then helps participants interpret the test results and, if necessary, works closely with them to identify and remedy sources of contamination. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer monitor or receiving additional information, please contact Teri King at guatemal@uw.edu.

The 2016 sampling season has been completed. Please check back in spring 2017 for the next season’s schedule and a downloadable flyer with dropoff locations, submittal form and instructions. 


Willapa Bay Oysters – A Documentary

Teri King, Marine Water Quality Specialist

This video documentary about Willapa Bay by Washington native Keith A. Cox captures the oystering livelihood and lifestyle that endure on Willapa Bay, southwest Washington, and define its spirit and tradition.

WSG supported the project and staff are working with the producer on hosting future film showings and an interactive display to accompany the film.